One More Chapter to Go!

Trap Me - Book - Gay Novel - LGBT - Furry - by Chris and Cooper Elkin - Elkin Books6Hello! Yes, yes, yes! We’re back. Worked very, very hard but we’re back!

 

Yes, we are almost done, including that extra chapter we talked about. Here comes the most interesting part in a novel – tying everything together.

 

Why interesting? Well, this is the part where worries become very intense.

 

“Is it really that good?” , “What if this is all silly?” , “Perhaps I should just rewrite the past 5 chapters.”

 

This is not the first time we are dealing with this, even if it is our first official book that is actually being published (omg!). If you are a writer (or just curious), here are a few tips on how to get over it already! Click “Continue Reading”!

 How do I write the perfect ending for my book?

Tip 1 – Does it make sense?

 

The question most writers tend to ask themselves is “Do I still like what I wrote?”
It’s not about that. You enjoyed writing your book so far (be it your first draft or your last), therefore the important question is “Does it make sense?”

 

Does the character react properly to the situation? Does each character’s motivation seem natural, logical? This is less of the “creativity” part of your brain that you put into function and more of the “logical” part of it.

 

Remember what we say: “You have to go with your heart AND your head when you write.”
…when it comes to reading, it’s safe to go just with your heart sometimes. 🙂

 

Tip 2 – Settled down? Good. Write.

 

Once you have established that everything fits into place and makes sense within the story you wrote, just continue writing. Give it a logical conclusion. It doesn’t mean it will be predictable and boring, it just has to make sense given the rules you set down until now.

 

For example: If you have a character who cannot walk throughout your story but in the epic climax he starts walking, that is cool but also might be expected. If you can make his FLY during the epic climax, that is unexpected, but not logical. Find the right balance between these two.

 

Tip 3 – Don’t rush it

 

We can’t put enough emphasis on this element.

 

A good friend who entrusted Chris with his book (Chris was his Beta-Reader / Editor) wrote everything nicely, all the elements gathered towards an epic climax aaaand… that climax lasted for half a page. Yup. In half a page he finished a build-up that the reader invested in for at least 100 pages.

 

After Chris’ input, he not only improved the climax, but he wrote an entire chapter dedicated to the epic battle. It turned out as it should have – excellent.
We’re also trying not to rush things, even if we’re very excited about everything.

 

Tip 4 – Don’t overstretch it

 

The ending is nigh and you are devastated. Your book doesn’t have as many pages as you initially thought it would. Let’s add more stuff to it!
Hahahano. Don’t do that.

 

Argument? Sure: Would you rather have a book that is short and awesome or long and boring?
“Padding”, as professionals seem to call it, is a terrible thing and we never understood why it is still a “thing” in the writers communities.

 

Tip 5 – Don’t add new stuff now

 

How will our heroes escape the pit of fire of doom of hell?
Aha! One of them just remembered that he has psychic abilities and can make water out of thin air!
…that is bad writing.

 

Unless you REALLY want your character to have something like that and you introduce it gradually throughout the book, hinting at it and foreshadowing it, then you should just stick to “what they have” in their climactic battles.

 

It’s the equivalent of having Indiana Jones pull out a Holy Hand Grenade at the end of “Last Crusade” and blowing up all the Nazis. Epic? Yes. Logical and satisfying? …not a chance 😀

 

So those were our quick tips on writing a good climactic ending. We could go on and on about all the little things but, if we do that, we wouldn’t have time to finish the book now, would we? ^^

 

Cheers!
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